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Over on Google+ at 08:29 on Friday, 19th September 2014...

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Weekend read: Wanting to be normal



by sjhoward

This is the 2,271st post. It was published at 08:11 on Friday, 19th September 2014.

I recommend an article I've read and enjoyed every Friday afternoon. You can browse all previous selections here.

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I don't often go for medical publications for my weekend recommended read, but this is worth it – Tania Glyde's piece on being normal, published this week in The Lancet Psychiatry.

If you were expecting something Scottish… There's been a lot of good stuff written, but I've read so much about it this week (and will no doubt read more in the week to come following the "no" vote) that I wanted to pick something different. I'm not at all bitter at having lost a long-standing bet…! 

Wanting to be normal. By – Tania Glyde

Weekend read: The worst day of my life is now New York’s hottest tourist attraction



by sjhoward

This is the 2,270th post. It was published at 12:30 on Friday, 12th September 2014.

I recommend an article I've read and enjoyed every Friday afternoon. You can browse all previous selections here.

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Yesterday was the 13th anniversary of the ‘9/11′ terrorist attacks on the United States. It is a day which I remember well. I recently found myself re-watching Jon Stewart’s extraordinary monologue on the first Daily Show after 9/11, and felt those same chills as I did thirteen years ago.

Earlier this year, the 9/11 Memorial Museum opened in New York. Steve Kandell, whose sister was killed in the attacks on the World Trade Center, had pre-opening admission to the Museum. His thoughtful BuzzFeed article reflecting on the content of the museum, and his reaction to it, seems a fitting article to post for this weekend.

Over on Google+ at 19:41 on Monday, 8th September 2014...

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Help me be less ignorant: Why do tech journos always talk negatively handling different mobile screen sizes for apps (as though devs hate doing it), while simultaneously giving very positive portrayal of responsive web design (as though devs love doing it)? Aren't they basically the same problem in different formats? Do app building tools make it more difficult to be responsive than it is on the web?

Weekend read: Of mozzarella sticks and marathons



by sjhoward

This is the 2,268th post. It was published at 18:45 on Friday, 5th September 2014.

I recommend an article I've read and enjoyed every Friday afternoon. You can browse all previous selections here.

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My recommend read for this weekend is – horror of horrors – a Gawker article. Caity Weaver's article documenting her "feat" of eating 32 mozzarella sticks in the course of a little more than 12 hours is a great bit of funny writing. The level of tension and disgust may be out of all proportion to the action being described, but that only serves to heighten the humour.

What if I told you that mozzarella sticks never had to end? That for $10, you could eat for free (for $10) for the rest of your natural life? That there exists a spot in the space-time continuum in which it is always Friday? That there are free refills on all Slushes™ excluding Red Bull® branded items?http://gawker.com/endless-appetizers-mark-beginning-of-our-collective-n-1601076939

Over on Google+ at 21:50 on Wednesday, 3rd September 2014...

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Weekend read: Apocalyptic shopping malls



by sjhoward

This is the 2,266th post. It was published at 10:07 on Friday, 29th August 2014.

I recommend an article I've read and enjoyed every Friday afternoon. You can browse all previous selections here.

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My recommended read for this weekend is really more of a recommended 'gawp' than something to read… but I like to do that sometimes.

It's a photo article from Slate, written by Jordan G Tiecher and feautring the photography of Seph Lawless. It features a number of arresting photographs of abandoned US shopping malls, taken from Seph's latest book. The photos that wonderful artistic haunting post-apocalyptic quality of urban exploration.

I hope you enjoy them as much as I did!

Photographer Seph Lawless had been traveling the country photographing a variety of “abandoned and broken” buildings for his book, Autopsy of America, when he came across two buildings from his past: Rolling Acres Mall in Akron, Ohio and Randall Park Mall in North Randall, Ohio. Growing up in nearby Cleveland, Lawless spent lots of…

Over on Google+ at 09:58 on Thursday, 28th August 2014...

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This is a great article from Daniel Cressey in Nature. I sometimes think there’s a lot of heat in the e-cigarette debate, but not a lot of light… this seems a pretty balanced look at the debate. Though it doesn’t touch much on the economic arguments for and against regulation, which is a bit of a shame.

In the haze of incomplete data, scientists are divided over the risks and benefits of electronic cigarettes.

Over on Google+ at 10:50 on Wednesday, 27th August 2014...

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I see that many people are mocking Ryanair for their 'admission' that "Premium seats will be the same standard seats". Seems a bit of a cheap shot, considering that the same is true of EasyJet, BMI, BA domestic flights, and many others besides…!

Low-cost airline Ryanair is to offer a “business class” service on all of its flights as it tries to gain a bigger share of the European corporate travel market. Branded “Business Plus”, tickets start from €69.99 and allow unlimited flight changes,

Weekend read: Death by PowerPoint



by sjhoward

This is the 2,263rd post. It was published at 12:30 on Friday, 22nd August 2014.

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I recommend an article I've read and enjoyed every Friday afternoon. You can browse all previous selections here.

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The people in this stock photo, like most people in stock photos, look happy. How many times in your life have you sat through a PowerPoint presentation – particularly one on an inadequately size TV – and been that happy? Not terribly often, I suspect.

And so my recommended read for this weekend is a wonderfully sweary post on Medium, written by Robin Hardwick. It’s a guide to writing a PowerPoint presentation that won’t cause people to want to commit suicide. Here’s a sample:

I don’t need a slide that says HOUSEKEEPING to tell me that I can get up and go to the bathroom whenever I need to. It’s not like I was going to stay in my seat at all costs and soil my drawers so I won’t miss a precious moment of your Screen Beans describing what teamwork means.

Well, quite. Writing as somebody whose heart sinks when PowerPoint is fired up, I’d say that this article shouldn’t just be a recommended read, it should be compulsory for everyone who might ever have to give a presentation. It’s excellent.

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