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Photo-a-day 224: Ouseburn spectacular!

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Warning: This post was published more than 5 years ago.

I keep old posts on the site because sometimes it's interesting to read old content. Not everything that is old is bad. Also, I think people might be interested to track how my views have changed over time: for example, how my strident teenage views have mellowed and matured!

But given the age of this post, please bear in mind:

  • My views might have changed in the 5 years since I wrote this post.
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Many thanks for your understanding.

Over the course of this photographic year, I’ve featured lots of bits of the Ouseburn, a local river that runs from its source, near Newcastle airport, to the Tyne, near the famous Quayside. It also passes fairly near my house.

I’ve featured it so many times now that I know it’s become a groan-worthy subject for some: Wendy included! But today, I wanted to show you the Ouseburn at Ouseburn: the point at which the river flows through its namesake part of Newcastle, in the Ouseburn Valley. This is it flowing under the huge Byker Bridge:

20120811-190955.jpg

The Byker Bridge was opened in 1878, and, in something resembling current Government policy, its construction was funded by a toll charged for use until 1895. It was designed by Robert Hodgson, who was better known for his rail bridges. It is built entirely of brick, and is almost 100ft tall and over 1000 feet long. This picture gives a better sense of scale:

20120811-191650.jpg

Perhaps the more interesting construction which lies almost alongside Byker Bridge is the Ouseburn Viaduct, which carries the East Coast Mainline. It was – remarkably – originally a timber construction built in 1839. Thirty years later, the timber was switched to iron. Unfortunately, the viaduct is currently undergoing a £10m restoration, and so all that can be seen today is a web of scaffolding:

20120811-192737.jpg

I’ll have to visit again when the work is complete… Ouseburn will be back!

This 1,762nd post was filed under: Photo-a-day 2012, , , , .






More posts worth reading

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What I’ve been reading this month (published 5th August 2017)

Richard Dawkins: The God Delusion (published 2nd January 2007)

On NokiaSoft (published 3rd September 2013)

Pope ‘stable’ in hospital (published 2nd February 2005)

Photo-a-day 103: Two churches beside one another (published 12th April 2012)


Comments and responses

Trackback from elsewhere on the site



Trackback received at 14:55 on 8th September 2012.

This post has been referenced by another on this site:
sjhoward.co.uk » Photo-a-day 252: Violin


Comment from Anonymous


by Anonymous

Comment posted at 22:55 on 17th November 2012.

The Railway Bridge (Not Shown) that runs pararell with Byker Bridge has a metal plate on it opened 18……?. It is called St. PETERS BRIDGE. St ANNS ROPERY, ON CITY ROAD, (now long gone), in the early 195Os there was a Chimney (Crawhall Chimney) at St ANNS Ropery, in the shape of a coiled Rope which apparently was ‘coiled’ the wrong way Road. It served as a landmark for Sailors on the Tyne and was commonly known as the SAILORS CHIMNEY. Photographs of this Chimney are extremely rare, however the Ouseburn Trust have a print of the Chimney in one of their magazines.


Comment from sjhoward (author of the post)


by sjhoward

Comment posted at 22:59 on 17th November 2012.

Thanks, that sounds very interesting! I wonder what happened to it?


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