About me
Archive
About me

Nuclear power plant building plans revealed

close

Warning: This post was published more than 11 years ago.

I keep old posts on the site because sometimes it's interesting to read old content. Not everything that is old is bad. Also, I think people might be interested to track how my views have changed over time: for example, how my strident teenage views have mellowed and matured!

But given the age of this post, please bear in mind:

  • My views might have changed in the 11 years since I wrote this post.
  • This post might use language in ways which I would now consider inappropriate or offensive.
  • Factual information might be outdated.
  • Links might be broken; embedded material might not appear properly.

Many thanks for your understanding.

The Observer claims to have seen a document that says the government is to press ahead with plans to build several new nuclear power stations:

In a 46-paragraph briefing note for incoming ministers, Joan MacNaughton, the director-general of energy policy at the new Department of Productivity, Energy and Industry, warns that key policy targets to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and boost green energy are likely to fail, and that decisions on new nuclear power stations must be taken urgently. It advises that ‘it is generally easier to push ahead on controversial issues early in a new parliament’.

I don’t understand the reasoning here: We apparently live in an age where the terrorist threat is so great that civil liberties must be curtailed in order to deal with the problem. And yet this government is actively seeking to increase the amount of radioactive substances being shipped around the country, as well as (presumably) increasing the total amount in the country. This seems like a strange decision to make, unless we are to assume that Tony Blair thinks the terrorist threat is a passing phase, whilst nuclear energy will have long-lasting benefits.

If this is the case, then when does Mr Blair conceive that terrorists, who have been targeting more progressive nations for centuries, are ever going to stop doing so? There is simply never going to be a time when terrorists aren’t active in the world, which is precisely why the curtailment of civil liberties is wrong – it will necessarily become a permanent measure.

It all seems like a wildly haphazard, unconsidered plan to deal with climate change to me. But, having said all that, I have no better suggestions of a path to take.

This 570th post was filed under: News and Comment, Politics.






More posts worth reading

What I’ve been reading this month (published 6th February 2017)

What I’ve been reading this month (published 31st December 2016)

What I’ve been reading this month (published 30th November 2016)

aMazing new phone launches today (published 1st April 2007)

Photo-a-day 30: Gateshead Millennium Bridge (published 30th January 2012)

Crafty (published 27th February 2005)

Photo-a-day 187: Gateshead Millennium Bridge tilted (published 5th July 2012)


Comments and responses

No comments or responses to this article have been published yet.

Compose a new comment



Comment

You may use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong> .

If you would like to display a profile picture beside your comment, sign up for Gravatar, and enter your email address above.

By submitting your comment, you confirm that it conforms to the site's comment policy. Comments are subject to both automatic and human moderation, and may take some time to appear.



The content of this site is copyright protected by a Creative Commons License, with some rights reserved. All trademarks, images and logos remain the property of their respective owners. The accuracy of information on this site is in no way guaranteed. Opinions expressed are solely those of the author. No responsibility can be accepted for any loss or damage caused by reliance on the information provided by this site. This site uses cookies - click here for more information.