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Newspaper misspells own name in masthead

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This post was published more than 10 years ago

I keep old posts on the site because I often enjoy reading old content on other people's sites. Not everything that is old is bad. It can be interesting to see how views have changed over time: for example, how my strident teenage views have mellowed and matured.

But given the age of this post, please bear in mind:

  • My views might very well have changed in the 10 years since I wrote this post. I have written some very silly things over the years, many of which I find pretty embarrassing today.
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  • Factual information might be outdated.
  • Links might be broken; embedded material might not appear properly.

Okay. Consider yourself duly warned. Read on...

Valley News's front-page oopsie.

Valley News's front-page oopsie.

It seems that the New Hampshire-based Valley News managed to misspell its own title on its own masthead on Monday by appending a superfluous ‘s’. Quite impressive stuff and, rather extraordinarily, not spotted by anybody involved in the production process.

No doubt if I owned a newspaper, stuff like that woud be happening all the time. But perhaps that’s not surprising given that I come from the home of the Southport Visiter, consistently misspelled for 164 years, and read theguardian – a paper not best known for its spellchecker, and whose spaceless nonsense masthead has fascinated me since its introduction.

On a more serious note, with editors everywhere laying off subeditors, claiming that they are no longer relevant or necessary in the multimedia newsroom, could there be a more prominent, clear demonstration that the role is still vital?

Without subs, accuracy suffers, whether it be grammatical or factual. And in the ever-more competitive world, where the internet means that CP Scott’s maxim that “Comment is free, but facts are sacred” has never been more true, what do newspapers have on their side, if not accuracy?

This 1,358th post was filed under: Headliner, , , , , , .

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Comments and responses

Comment from Michael West


by Michael West

Comment posted at 12:06 on 11th August 2008.

That’s quite a specimen indeed.

But while I appreciate that a lot of arguably literate people confuse a “masthead” with a “nameplate” (or “banner”, or “flag”), the problem is this: If you call the nameplate the “masthead”, then what the hell do you call the masthead?

Please get back to me with an answer.


Comment from kadri azharuddin


by kadri azharuddin

Comment posted at 10:52 on 28th January 2009.

Cool . . . . !

this is a new thing which i came across in a publication where language and spelling plays an important role.

I think this is not a mistake hope this might be a PR strategy which you can say may be a negative PR strategy so that people must know about the product.

Can you reply me that y they have done this or at what percent do you agree with my statement


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